ACRR Timeline 1861 - 1933

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By Michael Andrescavage

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Atlantic City Railroad (ACRR)








Contents

1861-1889

  • Mar. 13, 1861 Williamstown Railroad incorporated in N.J.
  • Oct. 21, 1872 Williamstown Railroad opens for regular service between Atco and Williamstown; connects at Atco with Camden & Atlantic and New Jersey Southern Railroads. (WdbryCnstn)
  • June 17, 1873 Camden, Gloucester & Mt. Ephraim Railway incorporated in New Jersey. (Val)
  • Oct. 1873 Manchester & Camden Railroad buys Kaighns Point ferry at Camden. (WSG)
  • Oct. 28, 1873 Camden, Gloucester & Mount Ephraim Railway begins construction; first narrow gauge railroad to be built under 1873 New Jersey General Railroad Law. (RRGaz)
  • Feb. 14, 1874 Camden, Gloucester & Mount Ephraim Railway (narrow gauge) opens between Camden and Gloucester, N.J.(RRG, CmdnDem)
  • Mar. 24, 1876 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway incorporated in New Jersey by former Camden & Atlantic stockholders Edward V. Massey, Samuel Richards and Charles R. Colwell to build rival, narrow-gauge line between Camden and Atlantic City; Charles R. Colwell, Pres. (Val, C&C, Boyer)
  • June 10, 1876 Camden, Gloucester & Mt. Ephraim Railway (3'-0" gauge) opens between Gloucester and Mount Ephraim, N.J. (CmdnDem)
  • June 10, 1876 Last run of Williamstown Railroad limited passenger service between Williamstown and Robanna; cut back to Williamstown. (Guide)
  • June 14, 1876 PRR Board declines request of Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway, then under construction, to install third rail and permit its trains to run into PRR's Camden Terminal.
  • Jan. 25, 1877 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway files location of Pleasantville Branch. (NJCorp)
  • Apr. 1, 1877 Construction of Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway begins from both ends.
  • July 7, 1877 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway (3'-6" narrow gauge) opens with directors excursion between Camden and Atlantic City; Theodore Frelinghuysen Wurts (1844-1911) is consulting engineer; rails are not joined until 5:25 PM; ferry terminal is at foot of Bulson Street, Camden, where freight station is former Board of Finance Building from Centennial; other Centennial buildings used as stations or the Atlantic City Excursion House are the Centennial Commissioners’ Building, the La Fayette Restaurant, the Centennial Bank Building, and the car annex of Machinery Hall; Atlantic City station is a former Centennial building; steamboat Pilot Boy runs between Bulson Street and Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. (RyW,)
  • July 11, 1877 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway files location of Excursion House Branch from Thorofare to beach south of Florida Avenue and Arctic Avenue & Absecon Inlet Branch on Arctic Avenue and between Vermont & New Hampshire Avenues to Inlet, both in Atlantic City. (Rdg)
  • July 21, 1877 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway begins regular revenue service between Bulson Street, Camden, and Atlantic City; begins rate war with Camden & Atlantic Railroad; ferry runs from Bulson Street to Pier 8 above Walnut Street wharf; company builds excursion house on ocean between Florida & Texas Avenues served by rail spur; wrecked by storm before finished; stations are: Oakland, Linden, Dentdale, Magnolia, Somerville, Laurel, White Horse, Clementon, Albion, Tansboro, Williamstown Jct., Cedar Brook, Blue Anchor, Winslow, Hammonton, Da Costa, Elwood, Egg Harbor, Cologne, Pomona, Pleasantville and Atlantic City; run three round trips, fastest in 2:45 vs. 1:30 on Camden & Atlantic Railroad . (RRG,HistAtCo)
  • July 25, 1877 Three cars of Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway excursion train derail near Tansboro; brakeman killed and 10 passengers injured; caused by shoddy construction of road, which deters people from using it. (RRG, Boyer)
  • Aug. 22, 1877 Camden & Atlantic Railroad Board authorizes cutting fares to $1.50 or $2.00 excursion to equal Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway. (MB, RRG)
  • Sep. 2, 1877 Camden & Atlantic Railroad and Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway begin offering 50-cent excursion tickets to Atlantic City; 104 carloads (8,000 people) carried at this fare on Camden & Atlantic and 42 cars (3,500 people) on Philadelphia & Atlantic City. (RyW)
  • Nov. 23, 1877 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway files location of Somers Point Branch. (NJCorp)
  • Feb. 1878 Charles R. Colwell elected Pres. of Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway, replacing William Massey, resigned. (RRG)
  • Apr. 17 ,1878 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway files location of Mississippi Avenue Branch in Atlantic City, running from near Thorofare down Mississippi Avenue to beach. (Rdg)
  • Apr. 19, 1878 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway files location of Mississippi Avenue Branch in Atlantic City. (NJCorp)
  • Apr. 22, 1878 Atlantic City City Council approves extension of Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway down Mississippi Avenue to ocean. (RyW)
  • Apr. 23, 1878 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway completes branch down Mississippi Avenue to ocean in Atlantic City after mini-"Frog War" with Camden & Atlantic over crossing its line in Atlantic Avenue. (RyW - C&C implies was built in sections with last part in 1892)
  • July 1, 1878 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway defaults on interest. (RRG)
  • July 13, 1878 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway enters receivership; Charles R. Colwell appointed receiver on suit of William Massey; at recent first excursion of season, Massey berates leaders of Atlantic City as greedy for free passes and for deserting P&AC and tells them they will have only one railroad next year. (RRG - RyW has 7/15)
  • Jan. 16, 1879 Camden & Atlantic Railroad Board authorizes negotiations to acquire Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway; authorizes contracting with Harlan & Hollingsworth for new iron ferry boat Coopers Point. (MB)
  • Jan. 25, 1879 West Jersey Railroad Board declines Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway’s asking price of $900,000, half in bonds and half in stock. (MB)
  • Feb. 5, 1879 William Massey agrees with Camden & Atlantic Railroad to turn over a controlling interest in Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway. (MB)
  • Feb. 6, 1879 Camden & Atlantic Railroad Board appoints committee on negotiations with Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway. (MB)
  • Mar. 20, 1879 Camden & Atlantic Railroad Board informed of conditional agreement with William Massey to buy Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway; also will have majority of Williamstown Railroad bonds within a few days; accept new Atlantic City ordinance; set Atlantic City fare as $1.25 one way and $2.00 excursion. (MB)
  • June 17, 1879 Camden & Atlantic Railroad Board authorizes Pres. Freeman to attend foreclosure sale of Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway with power to purchase. (MB)
  • July 7, 1879 Mortgage trustees William H. Gatzmer and Garrett B. Linderman take possession of Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway. (RyW)
  • July 13, 1879 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway owes $20,000 in back wages. (RyW)
  • July 1879 Ellis Clark of North Pennsylvania Railroad named Superintendent of Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway. (RyW)
  • July 17, 1879 Camden & Atlantic Railroad Board authorizes taking steps to enforce Feb. 5 agreement with William Massey to acquire Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway. (MB)
  • Aug. 14, 1879 Excursion train on Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway collides with freight near Clementon; 5 killed; Assistant Superintendent John S. Wurts arrested; investigation reveals poor discipline and record keeping, with train orders simply thrown into a drawer. (RRG)
  • Nov. 19, 1879 Ocean City Association organized by three brother Methodist ministers, S. Wesley Lake, Ezra B. Lake and James E. Lake to establish a Christian

family resort on Peck’s Beach, south of Absecon Island, N.J.; to be patterned after Ocean Grove. (Lee)

  • Feb. 5, 1880 Camden County jury acquits conductor of Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway freight train involved in Aug. 1879 wreck of manslaughter; hung jury in case of engineer. (NYT)
  • Feb. 9, 1880 Camden County judge acquits Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway Assistant Superintendent John S. Wurts of manslaughter in connection with 1879 wreck at Clementon on insufficient evidence. (RRG, NYT)
  • Feb. 10, 1880 Ocean City Association adopts plat for Ocean City, N.J. (Lee)
  • Feb. 27, 1880 West Jersey Railroad Board hears offer of Camden, Gloucester & Mt.Ephraim Railway to sell. (MB)
  • Mar. 18, 1880 Camden & Atlantic Railroad Board reports that PRR refuses to join in buying Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway, and Massey has increased his price from $390,000 to $420,000. (MB)
  • June 9, 1880 Pleasantville & Ocean City Railroad incorporated in New Jersey; William Massey, Pres. (Val)
  • June 25, 1880 West Jersey Railroad Board appoints conference committee to adjust questions with Camden & Atlantic Railroad; reports progress in negotiations to acquire Camden, Gloucester & Mt. Ephraim Railway. (MB)
  • Sep. 3, 1880 Cape May & Sewell’s Point Railroad incorporated in N.J. (NJCorp)
  • Oct. 15, 1880 Cape May & Sewell’s Point Railroad files map for line from Howard Street along ocean to new hotel at inlet. (NJCorp)
  • Oct. 26, 1880 Pleasantville & Ocean City Railroad (3'-6" narrow gauge) opens between Pleasantville and Somers Point, N.J.; operated by Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railway; opening excursion runs from Philadelphia to Ocean City; Ocean City Association operates connecting steamboat between Somers Point and Ocean City. (Val, Lee)
  • Jan. 1, 1885 W. Bertolet of the Reading appointed Superintendent of the Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railroad. (RyW)
  • May 14, 1885 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railroad files revised location of Baltic Avenue Branch in Atlantic City; runs north only as far as Massachusetts Avenue instead of to Inlet; connection turn south into main station as all trains stop there en route. (Rdg)
  • May 19, 1885 Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railroad contracts with Woodruff Sleeping & Parlor Coach Company to provide parlor car service. (Rdg)
  • June 21, 1885 Camden, Gloucester & Mount Ephraim Railway standard-gauged; Reading begins running all trains into CG&ME’s Kaighn’s Point Terminal and abandons the old Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railroad terminal at Bulson Street and the Bulson Street ferry. (RRGaz, Boyer)
  • June 23, 1885 Reading abandons its ferry to Bulson Street, Camden, and provides transfer to Kaighns Point terminal of Camden, Gloucester & Mount Ephraim Railway. (Coxey)
  • Dec. 4, 1885 CNJ transfers its rights to securities of Philadelphia & Atlantic City Railroad to Reading; William Massey receives $541,175 in P&AC bonds for his claims. (Rdg)
  • Dec. 5, 1885 CNJ transfers its rights in Williamstown & Delaware River Railroad to Reading. (Rdg)
  • Jan. 10, 1898 Removal of Smith and Windmill Islands in Delaware River completed. (Boyer)
  • Jan. 31, 1898 Atlantic City Railroad agrees with West Jersey & Seashore Railroad to remove crossing at Atco, cutting direct link between old CNJ Atco Branch and Williamstown Branch. (MB)
  • Feb. 1898 Reading begins construction of a ferry house at Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. (RRGaz)
  • Mar. 29, 1898 South Jersey Railroad sold at foreclosure at Winslow Jct. to Robert P. Linderman (1863-1903), Pres. of Bethlehem Iron Company, and Thomas Robb in interest of Reading for $300,000, giving it control of its access to Ocean City, Sea Isle City and Cape May resorts. (Val)
  • Apr. 9, 1898 Atlantic City Railroad begins operating property of former South Jersey Railroad under lease; agrees with Thomas Robb and Robert P. Linderman to reorganize South Jersey Railroad as the Seacoast Railroad. (Rdg)
  • Apr. 9, 1898 Seacoast Railroad deposits $37,600 with Atlantic City Railroad to be used for building overhead crossings of West Jersey & Seashore Railroad at Woodbine Jct. and Cape May Court House as required by reorganization of South Jersey Railroad. (Rdg)
  • Apr. 28, 1898 Seacoast Railroad organized as reorganization of South Jersey Railroad; Thomas Robb, Pres.; signs new through traffic agreement with Atlantic City Railroad. (Val, Rdg)
  • May 2, 1898 Atlantic City Railroad leases Seacoast Railroad, running from Winslow Jct. to Ocean City, Sea Isle City and Cape May as Cape May Division; Seacoast Railroad leases Ocean City Railroad. (Val, MB, Rdg)
  • May 16, 1898 Seacoast Railroad incorporated in New Jersey as reorganization of South Jersey Railroad; controlled by Reading (filing date). (Val)
  • May 28, 1898 Reading inaugurates Century Flyer scheduled at 80 minutes between Camden and Ocean City, N.J., sharply undercutting PRR time. (Coxey)
  • June 1898 N.J. Court of Chancery grants temporary injunction against West Jersey & Seashore Railroad interfering with crossing being built by Atlantic City Railroad in Atlantic City. (RyW)
  • July 1, 1898 Atlantic City Railroad resumes summer-only “60-minute flyer”; this year, PRR matches it. (RRGaz)
  • July 18, 1898 The 1,780-foot Steel Pier, a major amusement center, opens at the foot of Virginia Avenue in Atlantic City. (Butler)
  • Sep. 17, 1898 Philadelphia, Cedar Brook & Atlantic City RPO established on Atlantic City Railroad. (Kay)
  • May 25, 1899 Camden, N.J., ordinance requires relocation of certain railroad tracks, including line of Camden, Gloucester & Mt. Ephraim Railway in South Camden. (MB)
  • June 7, 1899 Atlantic City Railroad authorizes relocation of tracks between Bulson Street and Newtown Creek in South Camden. (MB)
  • June 7, 1899 Ocean City, N.J., ordinance authorizes Atlantic City Railroad to construct track on 4th Street north of Haven Avenue. (MB)
  • Sep. 1899 Regular races between Reading’s 4-4-2's and PRR Class E1 4-4-2's on Camden-Atlantic City trains at sustained speeds of up to 75 MPH. (RyW)
  • Oct. 9, 1899 New York Shipbuilding Company incorporated in N.J.; it selects a site at Camden for the construction of a large modern shipyard. (NJCorps)
  • Oct. 14, 1899 Sea View Hotel Company sells a part of its property in the Chelsea section of Atlantic City bounded by Albany, Annapolis, Atlantic and Ocean Avenues to the Atlantic City & Chelsea Improvement Company, which is to build a first-class resort hotel on it, for $360,000; the Sea View Excursion House is too far from the other resort attractions. (MB, Butler)

1900-1919

  • July 4, 1900 Atlantic City Railroad Class P-3a 4-4-2 sets new Camden-Atlantic City speed record of average 75.2 MPH.
  • June 14, 1901 Atlantic City Railroad absorbs Camden County Railroad, Ocean City Railroad, and Seacoast Railroad under agreement of May 24, 1901. (Val)
  • June 1, 1903 Winslow & Cape May RPO established on Atlantic City Railroad. (Kay)
  • Sep. 12, 1903 Storm destroys trestle leading to Brigantine Island on Philadelphia & Brigantine Railroad. (Coxey)
  • Oct. 9, 1903 Philadelphia & Brigantine Railroad abandons all service. (Coxey)
  • 1904 Atlantic City Railroad stops running all express trains on Baltic Acenue Branch, as main cottage district has shifted to south end of island; a limited number of trains operate over Baltic Avenue Branch until 1926. (RDG)
  • 1905 Atlantic City Railroad opens branch from Harbor Branch Jct. to fishing docks at Schellenger's Landing at Cape May, N.J. (C&C calls Cape May Real Estate Branch, 1.05 miles).
  • Jan. 26, 1906 West Jersey & Seashore Railroad obtains trackage rights over Atlantic City Railroad between Winslow Jct. and Woodbine Jct., providing a more direct route to resorts below Atlantic City than original West Jersey Railroad route via Millville. (Val)
  • June 30, 1906 Through service between Philadelphia and Cape May via Delair Bridge begins; express trains to Ocean City, Wildwood, and Cape May begin running via trackage rights over Atlantic City Railroad between Winslow Jct. and Woodbine Jct. to clear old WJ&S route for electric trains (or 6/26??); connecting tracks built at Woodbine Jct. (Mount Pleasant) and Winslow Jct. ( , Val)
  • 1908 Atlantic City Railroad opens between 4th Street and North Street (Ocean City Gardens) in Ocean City, N.J.
  • June 14, 1910 Wildwood & Delaware Bay Short Line Railroad incorporated in New Jersey to build branch to Wildwood in interest of Reading.
  • May 29, 1912 Stone Harbor Terminal Railroad incorporated in New Jersey in interest of South Jersey Realty Company to build short connecting link between Stone Harbor Railroad and Atlantic City Railroad at Cape May Court House. (Val, Cook)
  • June 30, 1912 Silver spike ceremony and excursion from Camden held to mark opening of Stone Harbor Railroad and Stone Harbor Terminal Railroad between Cape May Court House on Atlantic City Railroad and 2nd Avenue in Stone Harbor, N.J.; Stone Harbor

Railroad is operated by Stone Harbor Terminal Railroad by lease through Oct. 1912; for revenue service, line is later strung with trolley wire; experiments using an electric mine locomotive fail, and a surplus Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company trolley is substituted. (Val, Cook)

  • Dec. 12, 1912 Wildwood & Delaware Bay Short Line Railroad opens between Wildwood Jct. on Atlantic City Railroad and Wildwood, N.J.
  • Jan. 3, 1915 Kaighn's Point (Camden) Terminal of Atlantic City Railroad destroyed by fire.
  • Oct. 27, 1917 Cape May, Delaware Bay & Sewells Point Railroad abandoned. (ElctRyJrnl)

1920's

  • Nov. 1, 1920 PRR cancels interchangeable tickets with Reading for points between WJ&S and Atlantic City Railroad to all seashore points; had been implemented by USRA. (ATO)
  • May 1921 Stone Harbor Railroad resumes operation between Cape May Court House and Stone Harbor after being closed by USRA since Oct. 1918; Stone Harbor Railroad also operated Stone Harbor Terminal Railroad, which owns short track connecting with Atlantic City Railroad at Cape May Court House. (Val)
  • Sep. 10, 1921 Property of Stone Harbor Terminal Railroad deeded to Stone Harbor Railroad after foreclosure sale. (Val)
  • Apr. 30, 1922 Atlantic City Railroad inaugurates The Boardwalk Flyer, The Rocket, The Quaker City, and The William Penn between Camden and Atlantic City. (tt)
  • June 5, 1922 Atlantic City Railroad inaugurates The Baltic, a summer-only train between Camden and the Baltic Avenue Branch in Atlantic City; becomes sole train to serve this branch. (tt)
  • June 19, 1922 Atlantic City Railroad inaugurates The Ocean City Special, a summer-only commuter train between Ocean City and Camden, making the run to Philadelphia in 1:25. (tt)
  • July 2, 1922 Atlantic City Railroad's late night Camden-Atlantic City express No. 33 derails at 70 MPH at Winslow Jct., N.J., when inadvertently switched to the curving Cape May Branch track; with poor visibility in storm, towerman had mistaken a train of coaches being deadheaded to Atlantic City for July 4 traffic for No. 33, which was late; 7 killed, 89 injured. (MacDonald)
  • Sep. 3, 1923 Atlantic City experiences record Labor Day weekend crowds; PRR carries 200,000 and Reading 165,000; returning, PRR trains leave every 15 minutes and Reading every 20 minutes. (NYT)
  • May 14, 1924 Atlantic City Railroad opens new modern passenger terminal at Kaighn's Point, Camden, replacing old facility burned in 1915. (Coxey)
  • Apr. 1, 1925 Atlantic City Railroad installs automatic train control (ATC) between Camden and Atlantic City.
  • Sep. 13, 1925 Atlantic City Railroad discontinues passenger service between Ocean City Jct. and Sea Isle City, N.J. and abandons track east of Seaville. (Guide, Coxey - last trip would have been 9/12)
  • Sep. 6, 1926 Last run of Atlantic City Railroad's The Baltic from Baltic Avenue Branch in Atlantic City; end of passenger service on that branch. (RDG)
  • Jan. 6, 1927 Atlantic City Railroad inaugurates world's first continuous automatic train control between Camden and Atlantic City. (see 4/1/25!!!!)
  • Jan. 6, 1928 Four-party conference meeting in Pres. Atterbury's office considers questions of merging PRR and Reading lines in South Jersey and rising New Jersey taxes.
  • Jan. 22, 1928 PRR and Reading slash fare between Philadelphia and Atlantic City, Ocean City, Stone Harbor, Wildwood and Cape May to meet bus competition; two-day excursion round trip to Atlantic City is $2.25 vs. $4.12 regular fare, good through Oct. 31; PRR operates first Atlantic City excursion train ever via Delair Bridge. (NYT)
  • Feb. 10, 1928 CNJ-Reading cut New York-Atlantic City fares. (NYT)
  • Mar. 1, 1928 PRR cuts New York-Atlantic City fare to match CNJ-Reading cut. (NYT)
  • Sep. 19, 1928 Hurricane strikes southern New Jersey and New York metropolitan area; both PRR and Reading tracks washed out at Ocean City. (NYT)
  • 1928 West Jersey & Seashore Railroad gros revenue down over $1 million from 1927 and $2 million from 1926 because of competition from buses on Delaware River Bridge; Atlantic City Railroad down $900,000 from 1927 and $1.5 million from 1927. (NYT)
  • 1928 Atlantic City Railroad opens branch from Cape May Jct. to Cape May Point. (C&C)
  • Feb. 21, 1929 CNJ inaugurates Blue Comet between Jersey City and Atlantic City in competition with PRR; first U.S. deluxe, no-extra fare coach train in special blue-and-cream livery; operates over Atlantic City Railroad between Winslow Jct. and Atlantic City. (Baer)
  • Feb. 28, 1929 Reading Transportation Company begins operating buses between Philadelphia and Atlantic City. (RyAge)
  • Mar. 4, 1929 PRR adds one New York-Atlantic City express and places all __ trains on 3:00 schedule to meet CNJ competition. (Guide)
  • Apr. 27, 1929 Atlantic City Railroad discontinues passenger service between South Glassboro and Mullica Hill, N.J.
  • July 1929 New Jersey PUC approves Philadelphia-Camden-Atlantic City bus franchises for General Transit Company and Reading Transportation Company. (RyAge)
  • Aug. 3? 1929 N.J. PUC gives Public Service Corporation exclusive intrastate bus rights in south Jersey; PRR and Reading file for injunction on Aug. 5. (NYT)

1930's

  • May 30, 1930 Atlantic City Railroad begins operating Wildwood & Delaware Bay Short Line Railroad as its Wildwood Branch.
  • July 1930 Atlantic City Railroad buys control of Wildwood & Delaware Bay Short Line Railroad.
  • Dec. 17, 1930 PRR and Reading announce willingness to confer on merging South Jersey lines. (NYT)
  • Dec. 18, 1930 Representatives of all commercial and transportation interests in South Jersey meet with Gov. Larson in Camden; endorse rapid transit line on Delaware River Bridge over other options; Pres. Clement supports a rail tunnel to Camden; Reading objects as bridge line will not serve its new Kaighns Point Terminal. (1931 rept.)
  • 1930 Atlantic City Railroad purchases control of Stone Harbor Railroad.
  • Jan. 19, 1931 Joint resolution introduced in New Jersey Assembly calling for PUC to arrange for consolidation of Reading and PRR lines in southern New Jersey.
  • Jan. 21, 1931 South Jersey Transit Commission reports to Gov. Larson;recommends rapid transit line over Delaware River Bridge with transfer station for rail passengers at Broadway and a new bus station near City Hall; also consider but reject a rail tunnel from Suburban Station to PRR Camden Station under Arch and Filbert Streets and an extension of bridge line to Kaighns Point; PRR had originally surveyed the tunnel, estimated at $45 million and offered to operate it if the states paid for construction. (rept.)
  • Mar. 3, 1931 New Jersey Legislature orders Public Utility Commission to study railroad unification in South Jersey.
  • Dec. 11, 1931 New Jersey PUC issues report recommending consolidation of PRR and Reading lines in South Jersey. (Rept)
  • January 26, 1932 New Jersey Gov. A. Harry Moore calls meeting for Feb. 3 to consider consolidation of PRR and Reading lines in South Jersey.
  • June 25, 1933 PRR and Reading Company lines in southern New Jersey consolidated; West Jersey & Seashore Railroad leased to Atlantic City Railroad; connections built to ACRR north of Harbor Branch Jct. and 51st Street, Ocean City; WJ&S Cape May terminals and WJ&S Ocean City track abandoned; most other duplicate lines continue to operate through the summer season; buses replace rail service between 51st Street, Ocean City and Sea Isle City for summer.
  • July 14, 1933 Last run of Atlantic City Railroad passenger service between Williamstown Jct. and Glassboro, N.J.
  • July 15, 1933 Atlantic City Railroad Co. (Reading subsidiary) renamed Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines (P–RSL); PRR receives 66% percent interest and lease of WJ&S transferred to P–RSL.
  • Aug. 21, 1933 Pennsylvania-Reading Motor Lines, Inc (P-RML)., incorporated to combine bus operations of Pennsylvania Greyhound Transit and Reading Transportation Company in P–RSL territory.
  • Sep. 23, 1933 P–RSL closes former ACRR terminal at Kaighns Point, Camden, although only 10 years old; property sold back to Reading Company for freight use; passenger service discontinued on former Camden, Gloucester & Mt. Ephraim Railway west of West Jersey connection in Gloucester; also last runs of passenger service over ex-PRR lines between Stone Harbor and Townsends Inlet and between Sea Isle City Jct. and Sea Isle City.
  • P–RSL becomes a separate operating unit with its own general manager; is subtracted from Atlantic Division which is reduced to Camden-Bay Head Jct. and branches, but Atlantic Division and P–RSL retain common staff at divisional level; Pres. and VP are alternately from Reading or PRR each year.


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